I, the undersigned, acknowledge that I have read and understand the attached copies of the Sayre Fire Department Safety Guidelines and the Sayre Fire Department Standard Operating Guidelines and further agree to abide by them as required during the operation of the duties to which I respond as a firefighter.  I also understand that I have 30 days from the date received below to return this signed cover sheet to the Captain of my company.  If I do not return this signed within 30 days, I may not respond to any alarm.

 

Date Received                   ___________________________________________

 

Full Name                              ___________________________________________

(PLEASE PRINT)

Signed                                   ___________________________________________

 

Captain                                  ___________________________________________

 

Company                              ___________________________________________

 

Date Returned                   ___________________________________________



 


 

Table of Contents

 

SAFETY GUIDELINES

•                Introduction                                                                                         

•                SCBA                                                                                                    

•                Protective Clothing                                                                            

•                Driver Safety                                                                                       

•                Operating Power Saws                                                                      

•                Fire ground Safety                                                                             

 

STANDARD OPERATING GUIDELINES

•                Introduction                                                                                          

•                Structural Fire Response                                                                     

•                Trash Fire Response                                                                            

•                Vehicle Fire Response/MVA                                                              

•                Hazard Material Response                                                                  

•                Mutual-Aid Response                                                                         

•                Public Service Calls                                                                              

•                Apparatus Riding Positions (Attack Engine)                                   

•                Apparatus Riding Positions (Second Due Engine)                          

•                Apparatus Riding Positions (Truck Company)                               

•                Use of Communications Equipment                                                   

•                Cleaning, Maintaining, and Inspecting Portable Equip.              

•                LDH System Forward Layout Evolution                                        

•                LDH System Reverse Layout Evolution                                              

•                3" Forward Layout Evolution                                                             

•                3" Reverse Layout Evolution                                                              

•                FF/Fire Officer's Responsibility for Arson Detection                      

•                Pre-Fire Planning Guidelines                                                               

•                Reporting of Accident or Injury                                                          

                •                TAG System, Personnel Accountability                                   

               

 


SAYRE FIRE DEPARTMENT SAFETY GUIDELINES

INTRODUCTION

 

 

It is the intent of the Sayre Fire Department to establish a list of safety guidelines to prevent injury to its firefighters.  The firefighter frequently encounters a hostile environment where potentially life-threatening situations occur. It is necessary, therefore, that these safety guidelines be followed in order to prevent injuries or, at the very least, to reduce the severity of an injury.

 

While the Incident Commander is responsible for the safety of his men on the fire ground, this in no way releases the individual firefighter from his responsibility for his own safety and the safety of his fellow firefighters.

 

It would be impossible to establish a comprehensive list of safety guidelines, one that would cover every situation that is likely to occur. When situations arise which are not covered by these safety guidelines, the best rule of thumb is to use common sense.

 

These safety guidelines shall coincide with the Sayre Fire Dept. Inc. By‑laws and not conflict with the Sayre Borough Safety Guidelines.

 

These safety guidelines include but are not limited to the use of SCBA, fire ground safety, driver safety, station safety, and the use of power saws.

 

 

Adopted by Sayre Fire Board 10/80

Revised & Adopted 3/3/92

Revised & Adopted 5/4/93

 

Committee Members:

 

Robert Repasky

Gary Mullen

Thomas McCutcheon II

Richard Wolcott

Scott Nobles

Wayne Lantz

David Haines

Nicholas Shamot

Bill Soltis

Cy Morris


SELF‑CONTAINED BREATHING APPARATUS

 

It is the intent of the Sayre Fire Department that all personnel expected or likely to respond to, and function in, areas of atmospheric contamination, shall be equipped with, and trained in, the proper use and maintenance of the self‑contained breathing apparatus. (SCBA)     Company officers are responsible for the maintenance of SCBA assigned to their apparatus. If an SCBA is found to be functioning improperly, it shall be taken out of service, tagged, and reported to the company air officer as soon as possible.

 

Company air officer shall be appointed by the Captain of each company and should have completed a certified Scott SCBA maintenance class.

 

A Department air officer shall be appointed by the Chief of the Department, holding the same qualifications as the company air officer.  The department air officer shall be responsible for all repairs done to any SCBA and maintain the replacement parts and scheduled yearly maintenance.

 

All personnel shall use SCBA when encountering the following emergencies:

1.            Above ground level

2.            Below ground level

3.            Contaminated atmosphere

4.            Situation where the atmosphere is likely to become contaminated

 

Do not remove your SCBA until the atmosphere has been determined to be safe to operate in. Either use your SCBA or change the atmosphere.

 

Resist the tendency to prematurely remove breathing apparatus during routine fire situations. We all must be aware of the respiratory hazards, which exist in ordinary as well as the extraordinary fire situation. It is generally true that carbon monoxide levels increase during overhaul, due to incomplete combustion of smoldering materials.  The determination as to removal of breathing apparatus will be made by company or sector officers in routing situations.  In complex situations, particularly when toxic materials are involved, the safety officer and or the fire ground commander will make this decision.

 

Ordinarily a firefighter should use no more than two successive cylinders of air during the course of a structure fire.  However, a third cylinder may be used if the firefighter requests and receives permission from the department officer.  Permission will be denied if the firefighter shows any of the following symptoms:

a.            Light‑headed or dizziness

b.            Disorientation

c.            Rapid breathing for which there is no apparent reason

d.            Flushed skin

e.            Incoherently however slight

 

The department officer can reserve the right to have a firefighter checked by ambulance corps. personnel.

 

No member of the Fire Department, with a beard, or mustache that would impede the seal of the face piece is authorized to use SCBA in fire ground operations.


PROTECTIVE CLOTHING

 

The following are the Sayre Fire Department guidelines for wearing protective clothing. These policies apply to all members.

 

DEFINITION‑Full protective clothing: helmet with face shield or goggles, turnout coat, truck boots or bunker boots with turnout pants, gloves. Turnout coats less than 40" in length will not be worn with truck boots.  Truck boots shall not be worn for interior firefighting.

 

Members purchasing their own turnout gear should ensure that it meets or exceeds the current NFPA Standard.

 

·         The Sayre Fire Department will not endorse the purchase of personal protective equipment (bunker suit) by an individual member of the Sayre FD.

·         Any personal equipment bought by an individual prior to November 1, 1998, must be inspected by the Sayre Fire Board by 2/1/99.  All equipment shall be determined to depreciate in value at a rate of 20% of the total purchase price each year for a period of 5 years from the date of purchase.

·         The Captains of each Company will do a yearly inspection by February 1st  of each year.  This inspection shall check for any wear on the gear.  It shall also check for any abuse of the equipment.  A written report shall be submitted to the Fireboard listing all serial numbers, names, and findings of such.

·         Any personal protective equipment found to be damaged, shall be reported to the respective Captain and be presented at the next Fireboard meeting.  At that time, the Board shall determine what action to take to have the gear repaired or replaced.

·         Any personal protective equipment that is individually owned, that has been damaged, shall be reported to the Captain and presented at the next Fireboard meeting.  At that time, the Board will determine what action to take to have the gear repaired or replaced.  If the gear has been determined beyond repair, the gear will be replaced with department owned gear.

·         Any personal equipment that is damaged at an incident shall be reported immediately to the Company Officer in Charge and noted on the fire report.

 

Full protective clothing shall be worn on the fire ground by all firefighting personnel.

 

It is the intent of these guidelines that no member shall cause a delay in any firefighting operation by not being fully prepared to engage in firefighting activities in a safe manner.

 

It is recommended that members riding in an open cab apparatus wear a helmet.

 

When truck boots are being worn during firefighting operations, they must be pulled up to full extension.

 

Members riding fire apparatus in an exposed position shall wear their helmet with the face shield or goggles in position to provide eye protection.

 

No member shall ride the tailboard of any apparatus at any time.

 

All members shall wear full protective clothing to afford complete protection while operating at EMS incidents.

 

When operating forcible entry equipment and tools, full protective clothing shall be worn.

 

Helmets shall be worn when operating near moving vehicles, such as EMS incidents in the street.

 

 

 

 

The Commander may use his discretion to regulate this in those situations where exemptions to the above policy appear necessary, such as when the use of protective clothing may compromise patient care, or when it is necessary to operate in close quarters where full protective clothing cannot be worn.

 

The face shield shall be used at any time the need for eye protection seems apparent, such as during overhaul, when operating, hand or power tools, or any fires where the SCBA is not being worn.

 

Gloves shall be worn when engaged in firefighting, overhaul, training with hose or ladders, when using power or hand tools, and any other situation where injuries to the hand are likely to occur.

 

In specific situations for which no guidelines have been provided, the proper protective clothing to protect against all unforeseeable hazards shall be worn.


DRIVER SAFETY

 

When responding to emergency calls with red lights and siren, Fire Department vehicles will not exceed 35 mph, and will be regulated AT ALL TIMES by existing road and traffic conditions. The only exception to the 35 mph rule is when the apparatus is responding to a mutual aid call outside the Borough, which will necessitate the use of a major highway. At that time the apparatus will observe the posted speed limit, unless conditions warrant a lower speed.

 

Under wet, foggy, snow, ice, sleet, or any other hazardous weather or road conditions, Fire Department apparatus should react Pessimistically to the conditions encountered, and in no case exceed the 35mph limit.

 

Unless all lanes can be accounted for by the driver during an emergency response, Fire Department apparatus shall slow down and proceed with EXTREME CAUTION at all red light intersections and negative right‑of‑way situations. Rule of thumb: "IF YOU CAN'T SEE, STOP."

 

Avoid backing where possible, where backing is unavoidable, use guides; where guides are unavailable, dismount and walk completely around the apparatus before backing.

 

Members must ride in seats and use seat belts where they are provided.  Members may ride in exposed positions when there are not enough available seats, provided the member maintains a three-point contact with the apparatus. (one hand, two feet).  During an emergency response, apparatus should avoid passing other emergency vehicles. If this is unavoidable, the passing arrangement should be conducted through radio communications.

 

We must respond and react according to the conditions encountered; neither poor road conditions, nor inclement weather, nor the actions of others relieves the driver in the slightest degree of his responsibility to drive safely. These are situations likely to be encountered at any time and we must drive accordingly.  The unique hazards of driving on or adjacent to the fire ground requires the driver to use extreme caution and alertness, and also requires that he utilize a prudent speed for the conditions encountered, in order that he may react to the unexpected.  When driving apparatus on the fire ground, drivers must resist the tendency to drive hastily or imprudent. This tendency is mostly due to the urgent nature of fire ground operations.  Drivers must consider the danger their moving vehicle poses to fire ground personnel and spectators who may be preoccupied with the emergency, and inadvertently step in front of or behind a moving vehicle.

 

Before any apparatus moves, the Driver shall sound an audible alarm to signal his intent.  All drivers should use extreme caution at all railroad crossings.  Drivers must also be aware of the potential that exists for vehicle accidents on or near the fire ground due to the distractions caused by the emergency.

 

Company officers may designate spots at which their apparatus will stop to pick up firefighters. Firefighters to be picked up will wait until the apparatus has come to a complete stop before boarding and will then personally signal the driver when they are in a safe position to ride the apparatus. The apparatus assigned to the Central Station will not stop to pick up firefighters unless the situation warrants. In any case it is up to the discretion of this driver whether he stops.

 

Members are allowed to respond to the scene of an emergency in their privately owned vehicles (POV). Such members are subject to the same safety requirements as drivers of fire apparatus. IN NO CASE is a member responding to an emergency in his POV authorized to violate any traffic law or regulation.  All members should first attempt to respond to the station and resist going to the scene in their POV.

 

Members responding to the scene of an emergency in their POV's will park in such a manner that their vehicle will not interfere with the initial response of emergency vehicles or with future response of such apparatus. If Fire Police are on duty at the scene, members will park their vehicles in accordance with their instructions. Fire Police should attempt to allow parking of POV's as close to the scene as practicable. Such parking will be regulated by a desire to keep open avenues of response for emergency vehicles including ambulances transporting patients to the hospital.


 

 

The highest-ranking company officer shall ride in the officer’s seat of the apparatus.  Officers should resist driving the apparatus to alarms unless there are no other drivers.  If no officers are present, senior firefighters shall ride in the officer’s seat.

 

The driver is responsible for driving the apparatus to the alarm using defensive driving, and signaling lane changes and turns being made.  Officers or senior firefighters shall operate all audio warning devices as well as the radio.  Drivers shall resist the urge to operate everything while driving.

 

OPERATING POWER SAWS

 

When operating power equipment under emergency conditions, accident potential is high due to adverse operational conditions. A slight miscalculation or sudden unplanned move can result in a serious accident. Performance skill and proper instruction by a company officer, coupled with the use of common sense and the strict adherence to safety guidelines can prevent accidents.

 

PERSONNEL PROTECTION

 

Full protective clothing shall be worn by those members operating, and by those members in close proximity to the operation of power saws.

 

Face shield or goggles, will be in position to provide eye protection.

 

To prevent accidents caused by moving belts, gears, chains, blades, etc., it is imperative that the operator and the guide have their clothing completely buttoned up and close fitting.

 

OPERATING Guidelines

 

Carry the rescue saw with the engine stopped, the blade frontward, and the muffler away from your body.

 

Always carry the chain saw with the engine stopped, the guide bar and saw chain to the rear and the muffler away from your body.

 

Keep both hands on the control handles when operating the saw.  Use a firm grip with thumbs and fingers encircling the saw handles.

 

Make sure of your footing before operating the saw.

 

There shall always be a team of two men to perform cutting operations. The man operating the saw(operator) will be assisted and/or guided by the second man(guide).

 

The saw will always be shut down when unattended.

 

Have a plan of action before putting the saw into operation; your plan should include:

            1.            Location and sequence of cuts and openings.

            2.            Wind direction. Consider its effect on exposures and personnel.

            3.            Preplanned escape routes. You should provide for at least two(2) means of egress.

 

Whenever possible, an officer should be present to supervise cutting operations and to assure compliance with safety guidelines.

 

Always place the safety guard in the proper position to provide protection for the use intended before operating the saw.


Power saw operations are safest when cutting on horizontal surfaces near ground level or vertical surfaces at waist level or below.

 

Operating a power saw above the chest height is extremely hazardous and should not be attempted as a normal course of action.  This type of operation shall be conducted only under the direct supervision of an experienced officer and at his direct order. The officer ordering this operation shall weigh heavily the value gained against the extreme hazard to personnel.

 

The use of a power saw from ladders is not recommended if there are alternatives.

 

When operating close to highly combustible or flammable materials there shall always be a fire suppression device in close proximity of the situation.

 

Do not operate saws in suspected flammable/explosive atmospheres!

 

Side pressure or twisting of the blade when operating a rescue saw should be avoided. The saw should never be forced.  If too much pressure is applied to the blade, the hazard of blade breakage (carbide tipped) or blade shattering is increased. A blade, which breaks or shatters during cutting operations may cause serious injury to the operator, or to others in the area.

 

The saw cut should be only as deep as necessary. Deep cuts may weaken supporting beams and lead to collapse. The experienced operator will know when he has reached a beam by the sound and feel of the saw.  This is particularly important in the use of a chain saw.

 

If condition permit, scrape gravel and debris from the path to be cut, in order to reduce the danger of injury from flying chips and loose materials.

 

When using the rescue saw to open metal buildings, doors, etc., where conditions permit, utilize methods to eliminate the hazards of sharp edges. Consider making the cut in either an X design or a triangular design with the points bent inward.

 

FIREGROUND SAFETY

 

TACTICAL POSITIONING

 

Positioning of operating companies can severely affect the safety/survival of such companies. Personnel must use extreme caution when placed in the following positions:

            A.            Above the fire (floors/roofs)

            B.            Where fire can move in behind them.

            C.            When involved with opposing fire streams.

            D.            Combining interior and exterior attack.

            E.            Where a sector officer cannot control position or retreat.

            F.            With limited access: one-way in/out

            G.            Operating under involved roof structures.

            H.            In areas containing hazardous materials.

            I.            Below ground fires (basements, manholes, etc.)

            J.            In areas where a backdraft potential exists

 

The safety of firefighting personnel represents the major reason for an effective and well‑timed offensive/defensive decision and the associate write‑off by the IC. When the rescue of savable victims has been completed, the IC must ask himself: "Is the risk to my personnel worth the property I can save?"   When operating in a defensive mode, your operating position should be as far from the involved area as possible and still remain effective. Position and operate from behind barriers if available (fences, walls, etc.)

 

 

 


The intent is for personnel to utilize safe positioning where possible or available, in an effort to safeguard against sudden hazardous development such as backdraft explosion, structural collapse, etc.  When operating in an offensive mode, be aggressively offensive. An effective interior attack operation directed toward knocking down the fire eliminates most eventual safety problems.

 

Due to the inherent hazards of the immediate fire or incident scene, efforts will be made by the IC to limit the number of personnel on the fire ground to those assigned to a necessary function.

 

All personnel shall either:

                        A.             Be positioned in staging.

                        B.             Be assigned to a task or a sector.

                        C.             Having completed an assignment and no other assignment is available within that sector‑crews should be assigned to a resource, Staging, or Rehabilitation Sector until such time as they can be either reassigned to an operating sector or released to quarters.

 

The intent of this guideline is to minimize fire ground confusion/congestion and limit the number of personnel exposed to fire ground hazards to only those necessary to successfully control the operation. Individuals or crews shall be restricted from wandering about the fire ground or congregating in non‑functional groups. If you have not been assigned to a sector or you do not have a necessary staff function to perform, report back to your assigned apparatus.

 

In any hazardous material situation, the IC will engage only an absolute minimum number of properly trained personnel within the fire ground perimeter. Self‑standing master streams will be utilized wherever possible.  In situation where crews are operating from opposing or conflicting positions, such as front vs. rear attack streams, interior vs. exterior streams, roof crews vs. interior crews, etc., use radio or face to face communications to coordinate your actions with those of the opposing crew in an effort to prevent needless injury.

 

Ground crews and interior crews must be notified before ladder pipes go into operation.

 

Do not operate exterior streams, whether hand lines, master streams, ladder pipes, etc., into an area where interior crews are operating. This guideline is intended to prevent injuries to personnel due to steam blast and the driving of fire and/or heavy heat and smoke onto interior crews.

 

When laddering a roof, the ladder selected shall be one that will extend 2 to 3 rungs above the roofline.  This shall be done in an effort to provide personnel operating on the roof with a visible means of egress.

 

If possible, when laddering buildings under fire conditions, place ladders near building corners or firewalls as these areas are generally more stable in the event of structural collapse.

 

When operating above or below ground level, establish at least two separate escape routes where possible, such as stairways, ladders, exits, etc., preferably at opposite ends of the building or separated by considerable distance.

 

Many safety principle revolve around action that takes place on the fire ground.

 

For the purpose of the Sayre Fire Department operations, the fire ground is defined as: The area inside an imaginary boundary that has been determined by safety considerations according to the foreseeable hazards of the particular incident.

 

The flexibility boundary that determines the fire ground can be altered by various safety factors.  The boundary may include but is not limited to:

            A.            the center of the street

            B.             30' to 50' from a building

            C.             the area of possible explosion

            D.             the area of structural collapse

            E.             the area of smoke

All personnel entering the fire ground perimeter shall:

                *         wear full protective clothing

                *         notify the driver or an officer of their company

                *         have crew intact

                *         be assigned to a sector

                                   All others stay outside.

 

Pylons shall be position around the fire apparatus for personnel safety.

 

EVACUATION

 

Interior firefighting operations should be abandoned when the extent of the fire prohibits effective operations or the structure becomes unsafe to operate within. When conditions are such that interior firefighting positions become untenable, regroup, re‑communicate, and redeploy.  Our primary concern when a hazard, which may affect the safety of fire personnel, becomes apparent is the welfare of those personnel.  In an effort to protect personnel which may suffer the adverse effects of such hazards such as structural collapse, explosion, backdraft, etc., a structured method of area evacuation must be used, one which will provide for the rapid/effective notification of those personnel involved, and one which will be able to accurately account for those personnel.

 

The method of evacuation selected will vary depending on the following circumstances: 

                        A.             Imminence of the hazard

                        B.             Type and extent of the hazard

                        C.             Perception of the area affected by the hazard

 

A steady blast of air horns as well as radio communication should be used when a total and immediate evacuation of the structure or area is required.

 

EMERGENCY TRAFFIC

 

The term "Emergency Traffic" will be used by any unit encountering an immediately perilous situation and will receive the highest communications priority from base stations and all operating units.

 

When a unit has a critical message they will establish contact with the IC. For example: Sayre 21 to Sayre 1. "Emergency Traffic." The IC will acknowledge by repeating the term "Emergency Traffic." THE AIR ABSOLUTELY BELONGS TO ANY UNIT GIVING THE "EMERGENCY TRAFFIC" CALL.  The emergency traffic announcement is designed to provide immediate notification for all fire ground personnel of a notable hazard that is either about to occur or has occurred.

The use of "Emergency Traffic" should be initiated only when the hazard appears imminent.

 

Any member has the authority to use the "Emergency Traffic" announcement when it is felt that a notable danger to personnel is apparent; HOWEVER, considerable discretion should be applied to its use since it will become ineffective if over used.

 

When an imminent hazard has been realized, the emergency traffic process should be initiated.  Usually either a company or sector officer will be the initiator. The initiator should describe the apparent hazard and order a positive response, usually to evacuate particular area or section, according to the scope of the hazard.  If possible, the sector officers of those areas to be evacuated should request an acknowledgment of the emergency traffic dispatch from those crews to be evacuated.

 


Upon receipt of the emergency traffic evacuation order, company officers shall assemble their crews and promptly exit to a safe location where the company officer will again account for all crewmembers. Shortly after the evacuation order, sector officers shall begin the process of accounting for all evacuated crews.  When all affected crews and crewmembers are accounted for, the evacuation process is complete. At this time a more specific determination as to the extent of the hazard can be made and efforts initiated to redeploy/redirect attack forces.

It is a principal IC responsibility to continually evaluate and determine if the fire building is tenable for interior operations.  This on‑going evaluation of structural/fire conditions requires the input of company officers advising their respective sectors and of sectors advising the IC of the conditions in their local area of operation.

 

Structures of other than fire resistive/heavy timber construction are not designed to withstand the effects of fire and can be expected to fail after approximately twenty minutes of heavy fire involvement.  If after 10‑15 minutes of interior operations heavy fire conditions still exist, the IC should initiate a careful evaluation of structural condition and should be fully prepared to withdraw interior crews and resort to a defensive position.     Crews retreating from interior operations often require hose line protection. The personnel protection afforded to firefighting personnel in such situations represents a major function of such back‑up lines.

 

SEARCH AND RESCUE

 

Search and rescue should be performed according to an efficient, well‑planned guideline that has included the safety of search crew personnel.

 

It is standard operating guideline of the Sayre Fire Department to extend a primary search in all involved and exposed occupancies that can be entered. First arriving units must structure initial operations around the completion of the primary search. Primary search means firefighters have quickly gone through all affected area(s) and verified the removal and/or safety of all occupants.

 

The object of the search effort is to locate possible victims, not create additional ones by neglecting the safety of the search crew.


STANDARD OPERATING GUIDELINE

SAYRE VOL. FIRE DEPT.

 

 

 

 

The purpose of this text is to establish guidelines for all department personnel within the Sayre  Fire Department.  This is not meant to replace departmental by‑laws but rather to be used as a reference for any questions concerning departmental guidelines, fire ground operations, regulations or expected behavior as a member of the fire department.

 

It must be stressed that common sense is the most important rule of conduct. Because the situations and circumstances are so varied in the fire service, one finds that certain rules and regulations cannot be followed in the strictest sense but the standard operational guideline will inform members of the direction their decisions and actions should follow.

 

Keep in mind that every member's actions reflect on the department as a whole. One selfish act can destroy the fire department's positive image, one that we have strived to attain.

 

It is sincerely felt this will enable our department to work as a team, toward our goal ‑ the preservation of life and property.

 


STRUCTURAL FIRE RESPONSE

 

PURPOSE

 

To insure that initial fire ground operations will be handled by arriving apparatus on the scene as quickly and

efficiently as possible. 

 

SCOPE

 

All Fire Department personnel

 

RESPONSIBILITIES

 

All fire ground officers should be alert to conditions that reduce the response capability to lower numbers.   The

officer shall see that a vacant position is covered by another individual to insure completion of the task. 

 

First arriving apparatus shall decide whether they are to perform truck company duties or engine company operations.  This decision will be based on initial size-up or rescue requirements.

  

ENGINE COMPANY DUTIES

 

1.    Full protective clothing and SCBA are required as noted in the safety guideline. 

 

 

2.    Unless otherwise directed, a layout line will be made from the nearest water supply.   This is to be required on report of smoke condition or visible fire.   If the length of the layout is prohibitive, then the layout should begin from the nearest intersection enabling the second engine to pick up the supply line. This supply line shall be the largest line available. 

 

Note‑ if only 3 men are responding on the engine, the layout line should be dropped at the hydrant with the

firefighter remounting the engine.   The second due engine should be advised that it must establish the supply. 

 

3.    On arrival at the scene and after spotting the apparatus, the engineer shall begin water flow preparations

including connecting the supply line to the pump. 

 

4.    The officer shall see that the first suitable line (preconnected) shall be stretched to the building.    The line

shall not be smaller than 1½".   Dependant on manpower the officer may need to assist in this operation.. 

 

5.    The hydrant man shall return to the engine once the water flow is established to assist in the attack. 

 

6.    On all large structural fires, a preconnected  standpipe line will be stretched to the reported fire 

building,  or fire floor.   It shall not be charged until ordered by the officer.    The intent of this evolution is

to provide a hose line at the entrance of the structure.   Situations can occur when there is not a

standpipe system or  the structure is large requiring the use of a leader line, therefore a leader line with a hi‑rise

pack shall be advanced. 

 

  

TRUCK COMPANY DUTIES

 

It is imperative that truck company duties are performed as soon as possible upon arrival.   

 

GUIDELINE

 

1.    12 Truck 1 will serve as the truck company unless already engaged in the initial fire attack.  If 12 Truck 1 is engaged in fire attack then the 2nd arriving apparatus will assume the truck duties. 

 

Truck company duties shall consist of rescue, ventilation, salvage, and overhaul.     

 

ADDITIONAL ARRIVING APPARATUS

 

The 3rd arriving apparatus, not committed to truck work is assigned to check the rear for fire extension.   This unit will establish an additional supply line and also stretch (if not already done) a second suitable line to prevent fire extension..

 

ADDITIONAL APPARATUS

 

If it is determined that additional apparatus will be required, a staging area will be established by the IC. 

All incoming apparatus will report to this area to be known as the "staging area".  The officer assigned to this area will be known as the "staging area officer". 

 

TRASH FIRE RESPONSE

 

PURPOSE

 

To insure that initial fire ground operations will be handled by arriving apparatus on the scene as quickly and efficiently as possible

 

SCOPE

 

All Fire Department personnel

 

RESPONSIBILITIES

 

All fire ground officers should be alert to conditions that reduce the response capability to lower numbers.   The

officer shall see that a vacant position is covered by another individual to insure completion of the task. 

 

FIRST DUE APPARATUS.

 

1. Full protective clothing and SCBA are required as noted in the safety guideline

 

2. Apparatus placement shall be no closer than 50 feet. 

 

3. Unless otherwise directed an attack line no smaller than 1½" shall be stretched to the fire.  Dependant on the manpower available, the line officer may need to assist in the attack.

 

SECOND DUE APPARATUS

 

1.  Second arriving apparatus shall stand by at the nearest available water supply in preparation of laying a supply line to the scene.

 

 

 

VEHICLE FIRE RESPONSE/MVA

 

PURPOSE

 

To insure that initial fire ground operations will be handled by arriving apparatus on the scene as quickly and efficiently as possible.

 

SCOPE

 

All Fire Department personnel

 

RESPONSIBILITIES

 

All fire ground officers should be alert to conditions that reduce the response capability to lower numbers.   The

officer shall see that a vacant position is covered by another individual to insure completion of the task. 

 

FIRST DUE APPARATUS.

 

1. Full protective clothing and SCBA are required as noted in the safety guideline

 

2. Apparatus placement shall be no closer than 50 feet.  A longer distance may be required depending upon the size of the vehicle and/or the contents the vehicle is carrying.  (i.e. Flammable liquids, toxic chemicals)

 

3. Unless otherwise directed an attack line no smaller than 1½" shall be stretched to the vehicle.  Dependant on the manpower available, the  line officer may need to assist in the attack.

 

4. The attack shall be made from the side of the vehicle if possible. Attack from the bumper ends of the vehicle should be avoided.

 

SECOND DUE APPARATUS

 

1.  Second arriving apparatus shall stand by at the nearest available water supply in preparation of laying a supply line to the scene.

 

2.  Second arriving apparatus may be used to block traffic if ordered by the OIC.

 

HAZARD MATERIAL RESPONSE

 

PURPOSE

 

To insure that initial fire ground operations will be handled by arriving apparatus on the scene as quickly and efficiently as possible

 

SCOPE

 

All Fire Department personnel


RESPONSIBILITIES

 

All fire ground officers should be alert to conditions that reduce the response capability to lower numbers.   The

officer shall see that a vacant position is covered by another individual to insure completion of the task. 

 

GUIDELINE

 

1. Full protective clothing and SCBA are required as noted in the safety guideline

 

2. Responding apparatus shall try to determine type of hazardous material involved, quantity involved and exposures.  Apparatus shall be no closer than absolutely necessary determined by the contents involved.

 

3. The Incident Commander shall notify the Bradford County Communications as to the situation involved and the type of hazardous material involved.  The Bradford County EOC will notify the proper authorities as per their SOP's.

 

4. Defensive operations, i.e. diking, unmanned master streams, channeling, containment, may be completed as allowed by our personnel protective equipment and training.

 

MUTUAL-AID RESPONSE

 

PURPOSE

 

To insure that initial fire ground operations will be handled by arriving apparatus on the scene as quickly and efficiently as possible

 

SCOPE

 

All fire ground officers should be alert to conditions that reduce the response capability to lower numbers.   The

officer shall see that a vacant position is covered by another individual to insure completion of the task. 

 

GUIDELINE

 

1.  Full protective clothing is required as noted in the safety guideline.

 

2.  The chief officer of the responding company will be the department officer.  In the event that the chief officer of the company is not available, the next ranking chief will respond.  The remaining highest-ranking chief of the department shall remain in the borough.

 

3. Apparatus will respond with an officer, driver, and 3 firefighters.

 

4. No firefighters will respond in privately owned vehicles unless the fire scene is between their present location and the fire station.

 

5.  The response will be based upon the valley wide mutual aid box alarm system.

 

 

 

PUBLIC SERVICE CALLS

 

PURPOSE

 

To define the category of calls referred to as "public service calls" and to establish guidelines for handling such calls. 

 

 

SCOPE

 

All Fire Department personnel

 

RESPONSIBILITY

 

All fire ground officers

 

BACKGROUND

 

Often the fire service is called upon to assist the public or other agencies in various capacities.   Public assistance provides good public relations if handled properly and efficiently. 

 

Public service calls are those calls that are considered non‑emergency in nature nor life threatening.  

 

GUIDELINE

 

1.    All public service calls will be considered as non-emergency calls.   Warning devices such as red lights, sirens and air horns will not be used. 

 

2.    As per the Sayre fire dept. Safety guidelines, personnel riding the apparatus will follow the SOP.   While the call is non‑emergency in nature, it is possible that while on the public service call to receive an emergency call and protective gear will be essential.  Although protective clothing may not be needed for the public service call it should be readily available for and emergency.

 

3.    A minimum amount of personnel should be required to complete the mission.   Pagers may be activated if personnel response is in adequate.   Often, public service calls are pre‑arranged and sufficient personnel are at the station to handle the request.   Communications SOP should be followed to notify the communications center of apparatus location and disposition. 

 

5.    Any equipment utilized in the operations should be cleaned, maintained and inspected. 

 

6.    The incident should be properly documented in the incident response book in the apparatus. 

 

APPARATUS RIDING POSITIONS (ATTACK ENGINE)

 

PURPOSE

 

To establish standard operating guidelines and a position assignment system for fire response or situations where water flow is required.

 

SCOPE

 

All Fire Department personnel

 

RESPONSIBILITIES

 

Company officers are responsible for responsive action as required. Fire Department personnel are responsible to

understand each assigned riding position.

 

BACKGROUND


It is imperative to have harmony when arriving on the fire ground. Fire officers are too labored with responsibilities to permit individual assignment of tasks.  This system is designed to eliminate confusion for the first arriving apparatus. Responsibilities are specific. If followed, teamwork is evident, if not, chaos exists...

 

GUIDELINE

 

The following guidelines will be based upon the availability of fire personnel. The basic response is dependent on three fire firefighters. If additional personnel are present, they will assume the positions in numerical sequence.

 

The numbering of positions are as follows for the first due engine:

 

                1. Officer

                2. Engineer

                3. Attack line

                4. Layout

                5. Forcible entry

 

POSITION 1 ‑ OFFICER

 

Dons SCBA immediately in route if possible. Responsible for initial apparatus placement. Dependent upon manpower he may be required to assist in the advancement of the first attack line and/or assist in forcible entry. He should be positioned on the fire floor unless immediate fire control is not attained, without a superior officer responding, he may assume an outside command position. For interior operations, or assisting in line advancement, a hand light, portable radio should be taken. If no forcible entry man is on the engine, then forcible entry tools should be taken to the scene (flathead ax, halligan).

 

POSITION 2‑ ENGINEER

 

Safely delivers & positions the apparatus on the fire ground upon arrival, he engages the pump and develops a booster tank operation. The generator should be readied if required.  Communications should be established with officer and the second due engine. Supply line should be connected into intake readied for water supply. He shall assist if required on exterior operations if requested by the officer.

 

POSITION 3‑ ATTACK LINE

 

Dons SCBA upon arrival and advances the initial attack line to the fire floor. A line not smaller than 1½" shall be used.  If only 3 fire fighters are available, this position will be responsible for the layout of the supply line.  Once the hydrant wrap is made, he shall remount the apparatus and continue to the fire scene to carry out duties.

 

POSITION 4‑ LAYOUT

 

This position is responsible for the supply line layout. In working with 5" supply line it is imperative that the supply line and hydrant adaptor bag is placed at the beginning of the layout. Complete hydrant hookup should be made with hydra‑assist valve. Once line is connected and hydrant is operating this man will proceed to the fire ground, don SCBA, and advance the second attack line if it has not already been done so. If line has been advanced, report to the engine officer for specific duties.


POSITION 5‑ FORCIBLE ENTRY

 

Dons SCBA upon arrival and assists positions #1 and #3 in reaching the fire floor. Assist in ventilation, forcible

entry and search and rescue. Tools need to accomplish initial tasks will include ax, halligan, &hand light.

 

APPARATUS RIDING POSITIONS (SECOND DUE ENGINE)

 

PURPOSE

 

To establish standard operating guidelines and a position assignment system for fire response or a situation in which water flow is required.

 

SCOPE

 

All Fire Department personnel

 

RESPONSIBILITIES

 

Company officers are responsible for responsive action as required. Fire Department personnel are responsible to

understand each assigned riding position.

 

BACKGROUND

 

It is imperative that all personnel responding on a specific piece of apparatus understand that particular piece's responsibility. The primary objective of this particular piece of apparatus is to supply a backup line and to develop a secondary water supply.

 

The numbering of positions are as follows for the second due engine.

 

     1         Officer

     2         Engineer

     3         Backup attack line

     4         Forcible entry

     5         Ventilation/support

 

POSITION 1 OFFICER

 

Dons SCBA immediately in route if possible. Responsible for initial apparatus placement. Dependent upon manpower he may be required to assist in the advancement of the backup attack line and/or assist in forcible entry. He should be positioned with the backup line unless immediate fire control is not attained.  Without a superior officer responding, he shall assume an inside command position. For interior operations, or assisting in line advancement, a hand light, portable radio should be taken. If no forcible entry man is on the engine, then forcible entry tools should be taken to the scene (flathead ax, halligan)

 

POSITION 2  ENGINEER

 

Responsible for the safe arrival of the apparatus  to the fire ground insuring that it is in position to layout if ordered to do so.  The engineer will remain with the apparatus unless otherwise requested by the officer to assist in some other fire ground operation.

 

POSITION 3  BACKUP ATTACK LINE


Dons SCBA upon arrival and advances the secondary backup attack  line to the fire floor. A line not smaller than 1½" shall be used.  If only 3 fire fighters are available, this position will be responsible for the layout of the supply line.  Once the hydrant wrap is made, he shall remount the apparatus and continue to the fire scene to carry out duties.

 

POSITION 4 FORCIBLE ENTRY

 

Dons SCBA, and reports to the fire floor with the backup attack crew to assist in forcible entry and search and rescue. Tools to  perform this job will be halligan bar, flat head ax and hand light.  This position will perform forcible entry, search and rescue, interior ventilation and assist in salvage as requested by the officer.

 

POSITION 5 VENTILATION/SUPPORT

 

Dons SCBA, assist in setting of ladders to allow rescue, ventilation. Secures utilities as needed.  Tools should include a portable water extinguisher (PW), ceiling hook, pike pole.

 

APPARATUS RIDING POSITIONS (TRUCK COMPANY)

 

PURPOSE

 

To establish standard operating guidelines and a position assignment system for fire response or a situation in which truck work is required.

 

SCOPE

 

All Fire Department personnel

 

RESPONSIBILITIES

 

Company officers are responsible for responsive action as required. Fire Department personnel are responsible to understand each assigned riding position.

 

BACKGROUND

 

It is imperative that all personnel responding on a specific piece of apparatus understand that particular piece's responsibility. The primary objectives of this particular piece of apparatus is to serve as a "truck" company and if required, to develop an additional water supply.

 

While the truck functions will be required on all incidents, the determination as to the development of the additional water supply will be made by the OIC or company officer.

 

The numbering of positions is as follows for the truck company function.

     1. Officer

     2. Engineer

     3. Forcible entry

     4. Utility control ventilation

     5. Roof man outside support


POSITION 1 OFFICER

 

Insures that the water supply requirement has been met. Unless large flow requirements will be needed or the primary water supply has failed the officer will keep the apparatus "uncommitted" and available on the fire ground.  The officer dons SCBA and reports to the fire ground to assume truck company operations that include the raising of ladders, search and rescue, ventilation, overhaul, and salvage.  Communications shall be established with the engine officer and the OIC, which are imperative to a coordinated effort. If determined that an additional water supply will be required, the apparatus will lay a suitable supply line, with the apparatus officer remaining on the fire ground to command truck company operations. Position #5 will remain with the engineer to assist in water supply development.  Tools required to complete truck operations shall be taken from the apparatus and other required tools should be available from the engine.

 

POSITION 2 ENGINEER

 

Responsible for the safe arrival of the truck to the fire ground insuring that it is in the proper position to perform required duties.  The engineer will remain with the apparatus unless otherwise requested by the officer to assist in some other fire ground operation.

 

POSITION 3 FORCIBLE ENTRY

 

Dons SCBA, and reports to the fire floor with the attack crew to assist in forcible entry and search and rescue. Tools to perform job will be halligan bar, flat head ax and hand light. This position will perform forcible entry, search and rescue, interior ventilation and assist in salvage as requested by the officer.

 

POSITION 4 UTILITY CONTROL /VENTILATION

 

Dons SCBA, assist in setting of ladders to allow rescue and ventilation. Secures utilities as needed. Tools include portable extinguisher (PW), ceiling hook, pike pole and hand light.

 

POSITION 5  ROOFMAN  OUTSIDE SUPPORT

 

Dons SCBA, assists in raising ladders on the fire ground.  If topside ventilation is required this position will perform that function with the assistance of #4 position.  Tools include assortment of cutting tool (k‑12 saw, pike pole, ax, etc.) If a layout is required, this position will assist the engineer. Position #4 will assume fire ground truck company duties.

 

USE OF COMMUNICATIONS EQUIPMENT

 

PURPOSE

 

To establish guidelines for the use of communications equipment in both emergency and non‑emergency situations.

 

SCOPE

 

All Fire Department personnel who may be required from time to time to use any mode of communications equipment.

 

RESPONSIBILITY

 

All Fire Department personnel

 

BACKGROUND


The use of emergency communications equipment greatly enhances the operations of the Fire Department in every aspect of emergency response. However, the misuse or abuse of communications equipment can greatly hamper the overall operation and also have a far-reaching implication because it involves several agencies and is an indicator of our department's professionalism.

 

GUIDELINE

 

Incident command system will be used on all emergency calls no matter of the size of the incident.

 

As per Bradford County communications center standard operating procedure all responding apparatus will directly acknowledge the county communications center. Since more than one piece of apparatus may be responding, it is imperative that the airways are not tied up making the transmission of vital information impossible.  Brevity is vital. An example of a transmission via radio to the communication center acknowledging response is "Bradford County, 12 engine 3 responding to 117 S. East St.".

 

Again, as per county communications center SOP the first piece of apparatus on the scene shall provide a size up of the initial conditions. This is to be done by the first arriving unit only. The exception to this rule would be on a large structure in which the first arriving apparatus is responding from a different direction and reports a condition and the second arriving apparatus approaching from a different direction notes different initial conditions. On a small structure (i.e. dwelling or garage) "Bradford County, 12 engine 2 on scene ‑ fire showing or nothing showing or smoke showing.  On a large structure; Bradford County, 12 engine 2 on scene, side A, nothing showing.

 

All other apparatus arriving on the scene shall only acknowledge on scene arrival. "Bradford County 12 engine 3 on scene"

 

When the fire is out the incident commander will notify the county when the whole department is back in service. "Bradford County, department 12 back in service and returning to station"

       

All transmissions should be brief, impersonal and transmitted in a normal tone of voice. Personal names should be used only to reference a location.

 

The use of the "10 code" shall be avoided. This will eliminate confusion during transmissions.

 

The following is a list of all radio designations.

                SAYRE-1                              CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER

SAYRE-2                              1ST ASSISTANT CHIEF

SAYRE-3                              2ND ASSISTANT CHIEF

SAYRE 11                            CAPTAIN 12 TRUCK 1

SAYRE 21                            CAPTAIN 12 ENGINE 2

SAYRE 31                            CAPTAIN 12 ENGINE 3

SAYRE 12                            1st LIEUT. 12 TRUCK 1

SAYRE 13                            2nd LIEUT. 12 TRUCK 1

SAYRE 22                            1st LIEUT. 12 ENGINE 2

SAYRE 23                            2nd LIEUT. 12 ENGINE 2

SAYRE 32                            1st LIEUT. 12 ENGINE 3

SAYRE 33                            2nd LIEUT. 12 ENGINE 3

12 TRUCK 1                        105’ AIERIALCAT W/1500GPM PUMP

12 ENGINE 2                       1750 GPM PUMPER W/1100ft 5" HOSE

12 ENGINE 3                       1500 GPM PUMPER W/1100ft 5" HOSE

12 SQUAD 1                       UTILITY TRUCK

 

 

 

 

CLEANING, MAINTAINING, AND INSPECTING PORTABLE EQUIPMENT

 

PURPOSE


To insure that all portable equipment is in good working order, clean and ready for service at all times. 

 

SCOPE

 

All Fire Department personnel

 

RESPONSIBILITY

 

All fire ground officers

 

BACKGROUND

 

Portable equipment are the tools of our trade.   It is imperative that they are in good working order and ready

for service at all times.   If a tool fails on the fire ground, lives may be at stake and damage may result. 

 

GUIDELINE

 

All portable equipment will be inspected and tested as required on a weekly basis.   The captains are responsible to see that these goals are met.   Personnel may be delegated to perform inspections or perform maintenance as requested by the officer. 

 

All inspections, testing and maintenance should be reflected on the department inspection sheet. 

 

Any discrepancies or conditions noted requiring immediate action should be taken.   If a particular piece of equipment is defective or unsafe, the piece should be taken out of service.    When this situation occurs, it should be brought to the attention of the officers and noted on the inspection sheet as well as on the blackboard in the apparatus room. 

 

All equipment used at the emergency scene shall be inspected, sanitized or maintained as required upon returning to the station. 

 

While the apparatus itself is not considered portable equipment, upon returning to quarters it should be returned to the condition it was in prior to the alarm.   This may include refilling the booster tank, washing or replacing hose on the engine. 

 

LDH SYSTEM FORWARD LAYOUT EVOLUTION

 

The following detailed guideline will be used when required to make a forward layout with the large diameter hose system

 

GUIDELINE

 

1.             The hydrant man "catches" the hydrant in the normal fashion (wrapping sufficient hose around the hydrant), insuring that sufficient hose is available to permit the hydrant hookup. 

 

2.                Necessary adapters will be removed from the engine once it has stopped at the hydrant and will be placed near the hydrant.    The adapters are carried in the "hydrant bag" on the rear step of the engine.   These include: a 2½ “ nst female to 5" storz adapter, a 4½ " nst female to 5" storz adapter,.   Also, spanner wrenches for the storz couplings along with a hydrant wrench. 

 

3.             If a hydrant is equipped with a 4 ½ " steamer outlet, the 4 ½ ” nst to 5" storz outlet adapter should be utilized on the layout.

 

4.             If there is no steamer connection, the 2 ½ " to 5" storz adapter will be required.  

 

5.             The layout of 5" hose on a forward layout should not exceed 15 mph.   No personnel shall ride the tailboard.

 

6.             Once the apparatus has been positioned on the fire ground, the supply line must be broken and disconnected

at the nearest coupling.  If additional hose is required to make the pump connection a 25' or 50' length may be used to complete the connection.  The supply line will be connected into the gated intake valve. 

 

7.             Once all connections are complete, the hydrant man upon signal from the engineer will fully open the hydrant.  

8.             The hydrant man will proceed to the fire ground upon completion of the hydrant operation. 

 

LDH SYSTEM REVERSE LAYOUT GUIDELINE

 

The following detailed guideline will be used when using a reverse layout fire to water with the LDH hose system.

 

GUIDELINE

 

1.             One firefighter will remain at the beginning of the hose layout to ensure that the hose is not dragged or damaged.  He will then assist with connection to next arriving apparatus.

 

2.             Once the layout has begun, it will continue until the apparatus reaches the water supply or runs out of supply line.  If the latter occurs, the officer in charge shall be notified by the engineer on the engine  that a second engine will be required to complete the layout. 

 

3.             The supply line will be disconnected from the hose bed and connected to a 3" or 2ฝ" discharge with a 5" storz adapter.  If necessary, short lengths may be used. 

 

4.                Necessary connections to access the water source will be made:

A.  Hydrant system ‑ a 25' 5" length will be connected to the hydrant by the steamer connection if available or else the 2 ½ " discharge will be used. 

 

B.  Static source ‑ if the pump panel side is nearest to the water supply, the gated intake  will be removed to allow the connection of the hard suction line.   Hard suction should be placed in the water if at a static source or if using a dry hydrant it should be connected. 

 

5.             Once all connections have been made, the pumping operation should begin.   If at a pressurized water supply discharge pressure should not exceed 150 psi.  Intake water pressure should not drop below  20 psi on the compound gauge.  

 

6.             If operating at draft ,  the discharge pressure should not exceed 150 psi. 

 

7.             The next due engine will continue the water supply to the fire ground.  This may be completed by  using 5" line of available or multiple 3" or 2ฝ" lines.  This will depend upon equipment availability. 

 

3" FORWARD LAYOUT EVOLUTION

 

The following detailed guideline will be used when required to make a forward layout with 3" supply hose.

 

GUIDELINE

 


1.             The hydrant man "catches" the hydrant in the normal fashion (wrapping sufficient hose around the hydrant), insuring that sufficient hose is available to permit the hydrant hookup. 

 

2.                Necessary adapters will be removed from the apparatus once it has stopped at the hydrant and will be placed near the hydrant. These include a 2 ½ " double male, double female, 2, 2 ½ " hydrant gates, spanner wrenches, and hydrant wrench.

 

3.             The layout of 3” hose on a forward layout should not exceed 15 mph.   No personnel shall ride the tailboard

 

4.             A 2 ½” hydrant gate shall be placed on both 2 ½” outlets of the hydrant in the event of another hook up is needed.

 

5.             Once the apparatus has been positioned on the fire ground, the supply line must be broken and disconnected

at the nearest coupling. If additional hose is required to make the pump connection a 25' length may be used to complete the connection. The supply line will be connected into the gated intake valve. 

 

6.             Once all connections are complete, the hydrant man upon signal from the engineer will fully open the hydrant.  

7.             The hydrant man will proceed to the fire ground upon completion of the hydrant operation. 

 

3" REVERSE LAYOUT GUIDELINE

 

The following detailed guideline will be used when using a reverse layout fire to water with the 3" supply hose.

 

GUIDELINE

 

1.             One firefighter will remain at the beginning of the hose layout to ensure that the hose is not dragged or damaged.  He will then assist with connection to next arriving apparatus.

 

2.             Once the layout has begun, it will continue until the apparatus reaches the water supply or runs out of supply line. If the latter occurs, the officer in charge shall be notified by the engineer on the engine  that a second engine will be required to complete the layout. 

 

3.             The supply line will be disconnected from the hose bed and connected to a discharge.   If necessary, short lengths may be used. 

 

4.                Necessary connections to access the water source will be made:

                                A. Hydrant system ‑ 2 - 3" lengths will be connected to the hydrant with 2 – 2 ½” hydrant gates.

 

B.  Static source ‑ if the pump panel side is nearest to the water supply, the gated intake  will be removed to allow the connection of the hard suction line.   Hard suction should be placed in the water if at a static source or if using a dry hydrant it should be connected. 

 

5.             Once all connections have been made, the pumping operation should begin.   If at a pressurized water supply discharge pressure should not exceed 150 psi.  Intake water pressure should not drop below 20 psi on the compound gauge.  

 

6.             If operating at draft, the discharge pressure should not exceed 150 psi. 

 

7.             The next due engine will continue the water supply to the fire ground.  This may be completed by using a 5" line if available or multiple 3" or 2 ½” lines.  This will depend upon equipment availability. 

 

 

 

FIRE FIGHTER/FIRE OFFICER'S RESPONSIBILITY FOR ARSON DETECTION


PURPOSE

 

To establish responsibilities for the fire fighter and fire officer in aiding in the detection of arson which includes

the preservation of evidence, observation of fire ground conditions, behavioral objectives and the relay of vital

information to the officer in charge whenever arson is suspected.

 

SCOPE

 

All Fire Department personnel

 

RESPONSIBILITIES

 

All fire ground officers and fire personnel

 

BACKGROUND

 

Arson is one of America's fastest growing crimes. The vast destruction of property, termination of life and the endless suffering are all a part of the arson problem. To curtail this crime, the arson investigator requires all pertinent information from the receipt of the alarm to the extinguishing of the fire. This procedural guide will assist in providing information that may lead to the conviction of an arsonist.

 

GUIDELINE

 

As a fire fighter/fire officer enroute to an alarm, all senses should be sharpened on approaching the fire scene.

One should make a mental note of the weather conditions, persons or vehicles in the area, color of smoke as well as the amount of smoke and general location of fire upon arrival.

 

Once in operation on the fire ground, the fire fighter/fire officer should note the spread of fire, if there are multiple fire locations, and positions of doors and windows, noting which required forcible entry and which were opened.

 

The fire fighter/fire officer should be aware of the strong odors (i.e. Hydrocarbons or polar solvents) which

would not ordinarily be present.

 

The fire fighter/fire officer should look for suspicious persons that may be familiar faces at multiple fire scenes, persons overly willing to assist or overly willing to offer information about the incident. The fire fighter/officer should report this information to his supervisor immediately.

 

If the fire is obviously of suspicious origin, the fire officer shall provide security to the structure and/or vehicle and notification shall be made to the Pennsylvania State Police fire marshal for further investigation.  This will include all fires in which there are any serious injuries or fatalities.

 

Overhaul operations only essential to prevent addition fire spread will be preformed so as not to disturb the potential crime scene.

 

Upon return to station, written documentation of the events that transpired will be initiated and completed for future reference.

 

No information as to the suspected fire cause or other information relative to the incident will be released by department personnel except as that information is personally requested by the OIC or the PSP fire marshal.  Any release of information to the press will be made by the OIC and will be highly scrutinized.

 

 

PRE‑FIRE PLANNING GUIDELINE

 

PURPOSE

 

Pre‑fire planning is designed to provide the fire fighter/fire officer with the knowledge needed to identify large life loss potentials, fire spread potentials, egress problems and particular hazards of given occupancies within the fire protection district.   The following guideline identifies key areas with respect to the pre‑fire planning and the responsibility in gathering such information so that it can be used effectively on the fire ground. 

 

SCOPE

 

All Fire Department personnel

 

RESPONSIBILITIES

 

The chief of the department is responsible to see that pre‑fire plans are completed and reviewed for all target hazards within the fire protection district. 

 

Line officers, including the assistant chief, captains and training officer are responsible for coordinating pre‑fire plan visits, gathering of data and assembly of the final pre‑fire plan document. 

 

Firefighters are responsible, upon request, of the above outlined chain of command to participate in the gathering of data for pre‑fire plans. This activity will be part of the in‑service training program within the department.  All firefighters will be knowledgeable in the use of pre‑fire plans as a fire ground tool. 

 

BACKGROUND

 

Pre‑fire planning offers itself as a tool in which fire officers and fire fighters can survey properties in their response district. 

 

When a pre‑fire plan is used properly, it permits personnel to become more knowledgeable of the hazards within or around the structure, which in turn builds confidence, aids in life safety and should result in a more favorable outcome of the incident. 

 

Pre‑fire planning provides us with a road map -- a map that tells us where we are going, how we are going to get there and what we intend to do once we get there.

 

GUIDELINE

 

1.             Target hazards based upon life loss potential, exposure protection, construction, contents, with consideration of fire protection and salvage needs are to be considered while doing a pre fire plan. 

 

2.             Pre‑fire surveys will be pre‑arranged by the officer in charge. This will allow a better relationship with the owner/Fire Department.  It should be stressed to the owner that the mission of pre‑planning is to learn as much about the occupancy as possible.  The survey should not be confused with an inspection.

 

3.                Pre‑planning surveys should be conducted as a "team exercise".  When conducting a survey, key elements of the structure (i.e. Construction, egress, structural hazards, hydrant locations, utility locations)  shall be noted by assigned personnel. 

 

4.                Consideration shall be given to all exterior exposures/hazards, water source locations and overall dimensions of the structure, noting ventilation devices, as well as roof construction. 

 

5.             Note any automatic or manual fire protection devices or systems in or about the structure. 

 


6.             Upon completion of the survey, advise the owner/occupant that your team has completed the survey.   Thank the owner for his cooperation in the activity. 

 

7.             Review all information collected on the survey.    Compare information with other personnel within the survey team. 

 

8.             All information should be assembled in the final document format (see attached).   Drawings of the structure should be attached to the plan sheet. 

 

9.             Upon completion of the pre‑plan, the final document shall be reviewed by the chief of the department. 

 

Pre plan copies also will be provided by the chief of department for each first alarm company due on the box. 

 

REPORTING OF ACCIDENT OR INJURY

 

PURPOSE

 

To establish standard operating guideline in reporting an accident or injury.

 

SCOPE

 

All Fire Department personnel.

 

RESPONSIBILITIES

 

All Fire Department personnel are responsible for reporting any accident or injury to company officers. Fire Department personnel are also responsible to report any accident or injury to proper insurance carriers.

 

BACKGROUND

 

It is imperative that all accident or injuries are reported properly in order to insure that no cost is assumed by the individual.

 

GUIDELINE

 

 

1. Report all accidents or injuries, no matter how minor, to the proper company officer in charge.

 

2. Injuries requiring treatment or hospitalization must take the following steps.

 

A.  Report injury to company officer in charge.

 

B.  Report injury to Sayre borough secretary for Sayre borough insurance.

 


C.  Report injury to Gannon Agency in Athens for Sayre Fire Department firemen's relief association insurance.

 

D.  Upon medical release, individual shall report, in person, to the next fireboard/firemen's relief meeting with written notice from attending physician.

 


SAYRE FIRE DEPARTMENT

STANDARD OPERATING GUIDELINES

TAG SYSTEM

PERSONNEL ACCOUNTABILITY SYSTEM

 

The Personnel Accountability System that is suggested to be used in the Sayre Fire Department is outlined below.

 

All active members shall be assigned two tags.  Both tags shall have the person’s identification number on them.  The BLACK tag shall be used for on-scene accountability, and will be placed at a designated location at each incident.  The second tag shall be one of the following colors: RED, YELLOW, or GREEN, and will be assigned under the guidelines as follows:

 

RED TAG

Assigned to new members and persons who by choice or medical restrictions are only to engage in non-hazardous activities.  They are allowed on the incident scene and can engage in support activities only.

 

YELLOW TAG

Assigned to personnel who by choice or medical restrictions are not to engage in any area where SCBA(Self Contained Breathing Apparatus) is required.

 

GREEN TAG

Assigned to personnel who have no physical restrictions.  They can engage in any type of interior or exterior activity that may require the use of SCBA.

 

When an interior firefighter enters any structure for such activities as: Search and Rescue, fire suppression, overhaul, etc., they shall give their tag to the entrance officer at the time of entry and will pick up their tag when they exit.

 

The assignment of RED, YELLOW, and GREEN tags shall be reviewed annually.  Persons wishing to change their tag color may do so through a review committee assigned by the chief office.

 

This system is designed to meet the requirements outlined in the Firefighter Safety and Health Program, and is an important part of the incident command system.

 


SAYRE FIRE DEPARTMENT

STANDARD OPERATING GUIDELINES

TAG SYSTEM

PERSONNEL ACCOUNTABILITY SYSTEM

 

Training items listed below are the recommended standard to be used in the issuing and yearly review of colored tags that active members hold in this department.

 

RED TAG

Assigned to new members and persons who by choice or medical restrictions are only to engage in non-hazardous activities.  They are allowed on the incident scene and can engage in support activities only.

 

REQUIRED TRAINING:                                16-Hours new member training

            PA State IST training

 

YELLOW TAG

Assigned to personnel who by choice or medical restrictions are not to engage in any area where SCBA(Self Contained Breathing Apparatus) is required.  The exterior firefighter shall have training and knowledge in the following subjects:

FIRE BEHAVIOR

FORCIBLE ENTRY

VENTILATION

RESCUE

SAFETY

LADDERS

FIRE HOSE, NOZZLES, & APPLIANCES

OVERHAUL

 

REQUIRED TRAINING:                      PA State IST training

22-HOUR MISC. (To include above topics)

 

GREEN TAG

Assigned to personnel who have no physical restrictions.  They can engage in any type of interior or exterior activity that may require the use of SCBA.  The interior firefighter shall have training and knowledge in the following subjects:

FIRE BEHAVIOR

SCBA(Self Contained Breathing Apparatus)

FORCIBLE ENTRY

VENTILATION

RESCUE

SAFETY

LADDERS

FIRE HOSE, NOZZLES, & APPLIANCES

OVERHAUL

 

REQUIRED TRAINING:                                PA State IST Training

12-Hour SCBA

22-Hour Misc. (To include above topics)